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Victoire Marchant (Walking Victory) after JEAN LEON GEROME, Circa 1899


Maker(s): 
Date: Circa 1899
Materials/Techniques:    Carved ivory, cherrywood
Dimensions: h 36.5 "
w 19.0 "
d 19.5 "

Origin: FRENCH (?)
Inventory #: 10
Inscription:
AFTER THEORIGINAL MODEL BY JEAN LÉON GÉRÔME ( I824-1904)
IVORY ATTRIBUTED TO CLOVIS DELACOUR (1859-1929)
INSCRIBED ON THE BASE J.L. GÉRÔME

Other:


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After winning a Medal of Honor for his large group, The Gladiators, at the Paris Exposition Universelle of 1878, Gérôme began to concentrate less on painting and more on sculpture. According to Peter Fusco and H.W. Janson, The Romantics to Rodin, Exhibition Catalogue, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 1980, p. 286, Gérôme first created his sculptural models in plaster, and then left it to various bronze foundries, such as Barbedienne, or marble carvers to execute the final product. Gérôme was very interested in the chryselephantine sculptural methods of the ancient world and he carried out several experiments in this vein. According to Fusco, op.cit., Gérôme sought to make his marbles more realistic by tinting them and further combining materials in their production, such as bronze, marble and ivory "....perhaps attaining more sumptuous effects than those of the ancient chryselephantine technique he emulated."

His 'Victoire Marchant', here executed in wood and ivory, certainly represents this new approach to sculpture, employing materials that fall out of the mainstream in the realm of 19th century serial bronze manufacturing. A now lost plaster figure of this model (also known as Striding Victory or Nike) is illustrated by Gerald M. Ackerman, The Life and Work of ]ean-Léon Gérôme, Sotheby's Publications,1986, pp. 324-325, who mentions that it was manufactured in very limited editions by the Siot foundry, and one example was exhibited at the Salon of 1899 as 'Bronze, presented to the winner of the Grand Prize of 1899 by the Society for the Encouragement of Sports'.

RELATED LITERATURE;
Andreas Bluhm, 
The Colour of Sculpture 1840-1910, catalogue of the exhibition held at the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, 1996.